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Thursday, March 4, 2010

Cherry Jewelry Box - Episode Three

First, I'd like to thank Calvin for writing in and suggesting that I publish my videos to iTunes. I'm happy to announce that I have done just that, and you'll notice a new icon to the top right of the blog page where you can subscribe to the feed via iTunes and watch on your iPod. I hope you find this new feature handy.

Now back to the project at hand. I got to the point of finishing the box glue-up, and needed to proceed to cutting the top of the box free from the bottom. I have seen folks use several different methods for this, and since my dovetail pins are very narrow, I wanted to make sure I used the most efficient, while safe method possible. So I did a little Myth Busters inspired episode to determine whether table saw or band saw represent the best solution. You'll see which method won out and why.  You'll also get to see the final form of the box take shape.

10 comments:

Grover said...

Nice video. I like the idea of using the bandsaw as well. Did you have any blade drift while cutting the top off.

--Grover
http://groverwoodworks.blogspot.com

Rob Bois said...

Grover makes a good point, you need to have your fence dialed in to compensate for any blade drift to make this method work. I am lucky in that I have zero blade drift (thanks Rikon), but if I did, I would have had to adjust the fence angle to match the blade drift. Then this method would still work.

Grover said...

Rob that's awesome. I have been looking at the Rikon for my bandsaw. I want to get one that has 12" resaw for building guitars but I have heard great things about Rikon. It looked like that it cut that box like butter.

sanga said...
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Bruce S. said...

Rob,

Great lead up discussion and demonstration of the two techniques. Like others, I am interested in how well the Bandsaw cut came out on this box.

Rob Bois said...

Overall you do need to clean up the bandsawn cut a bit more than a table saw cut. The exception is if you get any burning with the table saw blade, it could require just as much cleaning up as the band saw (whereas the band saw eliminates the risk of burning). For this material, and for safety, I think the bandsaw is the way to go - especially if you have a good set of hand planes. If you only have sandpaper, then the TS is probably the better option - no way you're going to get a nice flat clean line with sandpaper.

Jeremy said...

Great Video, Rob
When you did your test on the band saw, I could see that you had a problem towards the end. I have to assume that at that point your push had enough leverage that you were squeezing the blade and binding it up a bit, and that is why you had to push harder and then the blade almost broke out of the back side. I would recommend having some sort of shim ready to put in the front of the cut to eliminate that binding.

-Jeremy
"Griptruk"

Rob Bois said...

Actually Jeremy, the cutting operation slows down at both the beginning and end of the cut because you have to cut through the entire width of the box front and back (the inside of the box goes fast since it's only an inch total stock you are removing). So there was no issue of binding at the end, just a lot more stock removal.

Jeremy said...

Well, I stand corrected! I watched it again and I see what you mean, and also that you weren't really pushing it so it could pinch either.

Rob Bois said...

To be honest I've never really had a problem with a bandsaw blade binding, which is one of the reasons I use it in lieu of ripping on the table saw for any operation where binding could be an issue. Ripping rough stock before jointing, ripping wider stock, or ripping lumber with funky internal forces.